About Rachel and the Services
About Rachel

Rachel has had a passion for animals for as long as she can remember. She has taught horseback riding lessons for 7 years, manages her own barn, exercised and trained horses as well as interning as a stallion manager at UC Davis. For years, Rachel had struggled with the performance issues of her horse Parker, and wanted to find a way to help him feel his best. Parker was often angry during chiropractic sessions and disliked a lot of touch around his body. Upon discovering the Masterton Method(TM) form of bodywork, Rachel had a practitioner out to work on Parker. She saw how calm and happy he was to receive a softer touch that worked with him in a relaxed state. In the days that followed this session, Parker was a different horse. He was bucking and playing in turnout and felt more forward and supple under saddle. This is when Rachel knew she needed to get involved in this work. 

What is Integrated Equine Bodywork?

The Masterson Method(TM) is a method of equine bodywork that goes far beyond a massage. This form of bodywork works with the horse in a calm relaxed state in order to to improve mobility in the key junctions of the horse and reduce tension that prevents the horse from performing to their full potential.  

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Who can benefit from bodywork?

-Horses in light-intense work

-Retired horses(a wonderful treat for their aging bodies!)

-Horses rehabbing from an acute injury(contact veterinarian to see if it's right for your horse)

-A healthy horse displaying one or more of the following:

  • A personality change such as being lethargic, shut down or grumpy ​

  • Difficulty relaxing during work

  • Picking up the wrong lead and/or preference traveling one way

  • Behind the leg/ not wanting to open their stride and travel forward

  • "Stickiness" in lateral work

  • Stiffness 

  • and more!

DISCLAIMER: Bodywork is NOT a replacement for veterinary attention. A lame or sick horse without veterinary care should not receive bodywork. Rachel can not diagnose or treat your horse for any lameness or illness. If you do not know if your horse is a good candidate for bodywork, contact your veterinarian.